Author Topic: [Tip] Working Network Case Studies  (Read 30074 times)

Offline jer1956

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[Tip] Working Network Case Studies
« on: November 25, 2010, 09:57:35 am »
I've asked this to become a sticky. Will those with working networks please describe them for the benefit of others. When quoting performance figures can you include the Med firmware version. Please don't post comment or questions amongst the Case Studies to keep them clear. If you have a problem replicating someones network please post it in the Technical Support - Networking area of the forum and refer back to this thread.
« Last Edit: June 13, 2011, 08:44:43 am by jer1956 »

Offline jer1956

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Re: Networking Case Studies
« Reply #1 on: November 25, 2010, 09:58:22 am »
Case 1

Architecture

1) Belkin F5D8633uk4A Wireless (2.4 GHz) N-300 (Draft 2)  ADSL Modem Router.
This is located in the lounge Home Theater Rack. The med500 is connected to this via lan cable. The router is set up for Wireless-N only, in 40mhz mode. Mixed b/g/n mode reduced performance and my WirelessG laptop couldn't connect anyway. DHCP starting IP raised to 8. PC, med500 and other permenent devices, given fixed IP's manually, below 8.

2) Buffalo WLI-UC-G300HP Wireless (2.4 Ghz) N-300 High Power USB 2.0 Adapter.
This is connected to the PC in the spare bedroom and 40mhz mode is enabled.

3)PC. Home constructed E8400 Core 2 Duo PC using gigabyte X38 chipset motherboard running Windows 7 (64) with 8 GB memory.

4)Buffalo WHR-G300N V2 Lan Bridge. This has DD-WRT firmware installed and is connected via cable to the Belkin router, adding a Wireless-B/G connection to the network. Only turned on as necessary for the laptop.

5)Sony S370 Bluray player. Linked by cable to Belkin router. Gives access to Internet TV sources such as BBC Iplayer.
 
Tweaks

1) Single high quality ADSL filter placed in master phone socket. All phones connect to the phone
side and the modem/ router is connected by a 25 ft fax cable.
Simplifying ADSL this way improved my ADSL connection by 20-30%.

2) TCP tweaked as described here:-
http://www.mede8erforum.com/index.php/topic,3504.0.html


3) Channels selected by using the following guidence:-
http://www.dd-wrt.com/wiki/index.php/Wireless-N_Configuration

Tests where performed and channels selected which produced the highest Link Speed during streaming HDV according to Windows Task Manager. Different lan drivers may use different metrics to report Link Speed.
The Buffalo Link Speed was dynamic under load and seemed to reflect the bandwidth allocated by TCP for each
transaction. Only high link speeds (81 mbps and above), in conjunction with low Utilization ( below 40%) produced stutter free streaming. Low link speeds and high utilization, even if they indicated the same bandwidth
(utilization x Link speed) being used, stuttered. Better performing channels where also the strongests with strengths at 70%.

Having done this and settled on channels 10/6, the sudden cold spell changed the atmospherics and
performance dropped! I re-tested and am now using channels 6/2. The link speeds are now usually over 108 mbps during streaming

Performance
Med Firmware 3.0.4

1) Samba copying from PC to Med500 4-4.6 mb/s

2)  Samba streaming from PC to Med500x  25 mbps (HDV)
 


« Last Edit: January 09, 2011, 12:01:40 pm by jer1956 »

Offline medens

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Re: [Tip] Working Network Case Studies
« Reply #2 on: November 28, 2010, 02:29:28 pm »
1. D-link DIR-665 router connected to 20Mbps cable internet

2. HP Pavilion dv9640 notebook wireless connected to router (WiFi 802.11g)

3. PC cable connected to router via Gb connection

4. WD world edition 1TB hdd cable connected to router via Gb connection

5. Conceptronics CH3MNAS 1TB RAID-1 cable connected to router via Gb connection

6. Mede8er (1TB hdd) wireless connected to router (with the original adapter)

- Wireless connection to Mede8er: 1.5 - 2MB / sec.
- Selected a free wireless channel
- Transfers from latop to Mede8er always via UBS connection because of speed.

Offline jer1956

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Re: [Tip] Working Network Case Studies
« Reply #3 on: November 29, 2010, 10:52:54 am »
Case 3

Adding wireless-N to current Wireless-G network

Architecture

I decided to try my old router and use the buffalo Lan Bridge in wireless-N. The cost of adding Wireless-N this would be 50 for the outdated Buffalo Lan Bridge and  Buffalo USB dongle for the PC!

1) Belkin F5D7633uk4A Wireless (2.4 Ghz) 125 Hi-Speed  ADSL Modem Router. This is located in the lounge Home Theater Rack.  PC, med500 and other permenent devices, given fixed IP's manually above 200, beyond the DHCP pool. Wireless only turned on when using laptop.

2)Buffalo WHR-G300N V2 (2.4 Ghz) Lan Bridge. Also located in lounge Home Theater Rack. This has DD-WRT firmware installed and is connected via cable to the Belkin router, adding a Wireless-N connection to the network. The router is set up for Wireless-N only, in 40mhz mode. The DD-WRT firmware can be found here:-
http://www.dd-wrt.com/site/index
It was set up using these instructions:-
http://www.dd-wrt.com/wiki/index.php/Wireless_Access_Point
Once working,  DHCP forwarding to the primary router was enabled.

3) Buffalo WLI-UC-G300HP Wireless (2.4 Ghz) N-300 High Power USB 2.0 Adapter. This is connected to the PC in the spare bedroom and 40mhz mode is enabled. The PC is a home constructed E8400 Core 2 Duo PC using gigabyte X38 chipset motherboard running Windows 7 Home Premium (64) with 8 GB memory.

4) Med500X. Connected by cable to Buffalo Lan Bridge.

5)Sony S370 Bluray player. Linked by cable to Belkin router. Gives access to Internet TV sources such as BBC Iplayer.
 
Tweaks

1) Single high quality ADSL filter placed in master phone socket. All phones connect to the phone side and the modem/ router is connected by a 25 ft fax cable.
Simplifying ADSL this way improved my ADSL connection by 20-30%.
 
2) TCP tweaked as described here:-
http://www.mede8erforum.com/index.php/topic,3504.0.html

3) Channels selected by using the following guidence:-
http://www.dd-wrt.com/wiki/index.php/Wireless-N_Configuration
Since I was using the DD-WRT router for wireless I decided to use it's comprehensive metrics to measure how good a given channel was. The wireless metrics show that actual Rx and Tx connection speeds for each wireless connection to the router, without having to measure actual throughput using a file transfer. It also allowed fine tuning of the Wireless-N USB stick aerial position. In this way I decided on using Channel 4/8 with RX and TX speeds fluctuating between 108 and 162 Mbps. Surprisingly the wireless strength was often down at 30% according to the PC! This was the only setting to get over 81 on both Tx and RX. Some channels where down at 13 Mbps!  Having such metrics in the router would help setting up networks using the Med500 USB dongle as the PC isn't able to monitor the wireless connection in that situation.
Tests where performed to confirm that streaming HDV was acceptable during which  the Link Speed was monitored using Windows Task Manager. Different lan drivers may use different metrics to report Link Speed.
The Buffalo Link Speed was dynamic under load and seemed to reflect the bandwidth allocated by TCP for each transaction. Only high link speeds (81 mbps and above), in conjunction with low Utilization ( below 40%) produced stutter free streaming. Low link speeds and high utilization, even if they indicated the same bandwidth (utilization x Link speed) being used, stuttered.
 The link speeds are normally about 108 mbps during streaming, but can reach 216 mbps. This is better than Case 1!

Performance

Med Firmware 3.0.5

1) Samba copying from PC to Med500 4.4-4.8 mb/s

2)  Samba streaming from PC to Med500x
       HDV TS - 25 mbps
       Bluray VC-1 M2TS -  40 mbps (peak) 

Transport Streams (TS) are the native format of the chip. These are the formats used on bluray. Other package formats have been added by OEM's but they require unwrapping by the support processor. The support processor also  handles streaming. Using packages which require unwrapping reduces the maximum bitrate that  can be streamed.  I can't stream VC-1 at this bitrate as ISO, MKV or even using Bdav folder without unacceptable stuttering.

 Image 1 Network doing nothing
Windows shows misleading information. The link isn't working at 270 mbps.

Image 2 Network streaming VC-1 M2TS
Both Router and Windows now agree.
« Last Edit: January 09, 2011, 12:03:21 pm by jer1956 »

Offline UUBee

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Re: [Tip] Working Network Case Studies
« Reply #4 on: November 29, 2010, 10:00:30 pm »
Case 4) Mede8er connected to PC with Ethernet Cable.

This case is for user who don't have a router and a spare Ethernet Port on the PC.

Needed:
- 1 Free Ethernet port on the PC
- 1 CAT 5 Ethernet cable (if PC Ethernet Port is 1Gbps) or
- 1 CAT 5 Cross cable (if PC Ethernet Port is 10/100Mbps)

Step 1)
1) Connect the Mede8er to the PC
2) Open the Network settings of the Network Adapter connected to the Mede8er
3) Disable IPv6 if enabled
4) Make sure Client for Microsoft Networks is enabled (or add it)
5) Make sure File- and Printsharing is enabled (or add it)
6) Open the TCP/IP V4 properties
7) Enter IP address 192.168.2.1
8) Enter Subnet mask 255.255.255.0
9) Do NOT enter a default gateway
10) Save the settings bij pressing [OK]

Now be carefull, as long as the mede8er is not powered on, the adapter stays disconnected.

Step 2)
1) Power on Mede8er
2) Go to the Settings menu
3) Assign a Fixed IP address to the Mede8er LAN address, use the Address 192.168.2.2 with Subnet mask 255.255.255.0 and gateway 192.168.2.1
5) Enable NAS


Step 3)
1) Open Run... box (Winkey+R)
2) Type cmd.exe and press [OK]
   A Commandbox is opened.
3) Type the command: ping 192.168.2.1
4) After pressing [enter] there must be 5 replies
5) Now type the command: ping 192.168.2.2
6) After pressing [enter] there must be 5 replies
7) If successfull The Mede8er is connected to the PC and you can close the commandbox.

If Step 3.3 fails, check the settings of step 1.
If Step 3.6 fails, check the settings of step 2.
  
Graphical dispay:
[Internet router]--- Wireless ---[PC (XP/Vista/7)]--- Cable ---[Mede8er]

For Advanced Users, you can share Internet by enabling it in the Adapter properties. For this to work you need to enter the IP address of the PC in the DNS Settings of the Mede8er (192.168.2.1).

Additional comment: The NAS functionality only works if the MMede8er has an IP address AND the PC is on. So powerup the PC first and then the Mede8er.

Performasnce figures:
Read from Mede8er (using Teracopy): 5,5 MB/s
Write to Mede8er (using Teracopy): 5,3 MB/s
« Last Edit: November 30, 2010, 11:32:39 pm by UUBee »
2 liters of coca cola, 40 cl of Bacardi....

Offline markt1891

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Re: [Tip] Working Network Case Studies
« Reply #5 on: December 01, 2010, 05:57:29 pm »
Case 5: Mede8er streaming from Windows Home Server over Ethernet

Hardware

Med500x fw 3.0.4 (no HDD)
Custom build Windows Home Server (AMD Athlon II 240e, 2GB ram, 6 Sata Ports, 1 x 40gb (OS) + 2 x 1.5tb HDDs)
Netgear GS116 16 port 10/100 Ethernet switch
Cat5e patch panel
Netgear DG834 wifi/ADSL router
Panasonic TX-L37V10B
Panasonic DMP-BD60 Blu-ray player
Denon AVF100 Cinema System
KEF Home Cinema 5.1 speaker system

I also have a Win 7 x64 desktop but this is only used as a home PC (ripping DVD/Blu-ray etc.) and not for storage or streaming.

Architecture

The Cat5e patch panel, switch and WHS are all in the roofspace of my house.  I have installed Cat5e ports by my TV/AV system and home PC.  These are routed up to the roofspace and terminated in the patch panel.  The Med500x, WHS, TV, Blu-ray player and PC are connected via ethernet to the switch.  The Netgear router is also connected to the switch so that all devices on the LAN can get to the internet.

The WHS has a 40gb disk for the OS and two 1.5tb disks for data.  The data is mirrored between the disks using the duplication functionality in WHS (please MS... don't remove this in the next release).  All of my data is on the WHS.  This includes personal documents, photos, music and video (m2ts from HD camcorder, DVD ISO and Blu-ray MKV).

There are both samba and NFS (HaneWin) shares on the WHS.

Tweaks

Compound TCP update for Windows Server 2003 installed on the WHS
Hanewin settings - UDP NFS Server Threads = 32 / NFS transfer size = 65535

Performance

I can stream any of my video content from the WHS to the Med8er.  For blu-ray content I have ripped them with MakeMKV.  At first I was unable to stream them easily and had quite a bit of stutter.  I solved this by removing unwanted audio streams.  Media Info for an example file shown below.

General
UniqueID                        : 169306461756157728322165222305112982552 (0x7F5F3D0AE4444DA982A0996B65030418)
Complete name            : \\HOMESERVER\Videos\Kids\Horton Hears A Who\Horton Hears A Who (2008) BLURAY.mkv
Format                             : Matroska
File size                           : 20.7 GiB
Duration                          : 1h 26mn
Overall bit rate                : 34.4 Mbps
Encoded date                : UTC 2010-11-10 20:31:35
Writing application        : MakeMKV v1.6.2 win(x64-release)
Writing library                 : libmakemkv v1.6.2 (0.7.7/0.8.1) win(x64-release)

Video
ID                                     : 1
Format                            : AVC
Format/Info                     : Advanced Video Codec
Format profile                      : High@L4.1
Format settings, CABAC           : Yes
Format settings, ReFrames        : 4 frames
Format settings, GOP             : M=1, N=25
Codec ID                         : V_MPEG4/ISO/AVC
Duration                         : 1h 26mn
Bit rate mode                    : Variable
Bit rate                         : 32.2 Mbps
Maximum bit rate                 : 35.0 Mbps
Width                            : 1 920 pixels
Height                           : 1 080 pixels
Display aspect ratio             : 16:9
Frame rate                       : 23.976 fps
Color space                      : YUV
Chroma subsampling               : 4:2:0
Bit depth                        : 8 bits
Scan type                        : Progressive
Bits/(Pixel*Frame)               : 0.648
Stream size                      : 19.4 GiB (94%)
Language                         : English
Color primaries                  : BT.709-5, BT.1361, IEC 61966-2-4, SMPTE RP177
Transfer characteristics         : BT.709-5, BT.1361
Matrix coefficients              : BT.709-5, BT.1361, IEC 61966-2-4 709, SMPTE RP177

Audio
ID                               : 2
Format                           : DTS
Format/Info                      : Digital Theater Systems
Codec ID                         : A_DTS
Duration                         : 1h 26mn
Bit rate mode                    : Constant
Bit rate                         : 1 510 Kbps
Channel(s)                       : 6 channels
Channel positions                : Front: L C R, Side: L R, LFE
Sampling rate                    : 48.0 KHz
Bit depth                        : 24 bits
Compression mode                 : Lossy
Stream size                      : 931 MiB (4%)
Title                            : 3/2+1
Language                         : English

Text #1
ID                               : 3
Format                           : PGS
Codec ID                         : S_HDMV/PGS
Codec ID/Info                    : The same subtitle format used on BDs/HD-DVDs
Language                         : English

Text #2
ID                               : 5
Format                           : PGS
Codec ID                         : S_HDMV/PGS
Codec ID/Info                    : The same subtitle format used on BDs/HD-DVDs
Language                         : English

I have noticed some very occassional stutter under fw 3.0.4 which was not there with v2.  I hope this will be fixed with the network improvements in v4 but I have not tested the beta yet.

If I copy a file from my Windows 7 x64 system to the WHS (std file shares) then it transfers at around 12-13 mb/s.

MED500X f/w v4.04 / MED400X2 f/w v3.0.1 / Denon AVR-F100 / 1gb Cat5e / Netgear GS716T-200 / Windows Home Server PP3 2 x 2tb / Panasonic TX-L37V10

Offline Maasbommel

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Re: [Tip] Working Network Case Studies
« Reply #6 on: December 05, 2010, 09:30:13 am »
Case 6

Tools used:
Bandwidth conversion calculator
http://web.forret.com/tools/bandwidth.asp

Synology Network Monitor (embedded in the Synology NAS Gui)

Architecture

1) Netgear WNDR3700 with Firmware V1.0.4.68
This is located in the hall way. The med500 is connected to this by using a Linksys WET610N Wifi Ethernet Bridge with Ver.1.0.03 Firmware.
So WET610N is connected by UTP cable to the Mede8er Ethernet port and over Wireless connection to the Netgear router.
WNDR3700 is setup to always give same ip address to the Mede8er (locked on mac address).
Router and bridge are setup to connect with 5Ghz Radio / 40 Mhz mode.
Using Channel 46/44 with WPA2 Personal encryption.
Read from the WET610N GUI status screen the quality of the Wifi connection between WNDR3700 and the WET610N:
- signal strength 40%

2] Mede8er with V4beta4 firmware. Connected to a WET610N Linksys Wifi Ethernet bridge.
Mede8er is setup DHCP on Lan port. Connected to a Samsung TV 52" LCD LE52A756R1M FW 1013.1 by HDMI cable.

3] Synology NAS 4-bay DS409slim with 4 500GB disks in Hybrid Raid (SHR) mode setup with DSM 3.0-1337 firmware.
Synology NAS is attached to WNDR3700 router by lan cable (1Gbit). Jumbo frames is set to off.

4) PC, a HP Q6600 Quad Core PC running Windows 7 (64) with 6 GB memory. Connected by lan cable (Gbit ethernet) to one of the Gbit lanports of the WNDR3700 router.

Tests where performed using the embedded Synology Network monitor to watch network (stream) speed, using a Avatar movie 1080p resolution (BDMV and an mkv version).

Performance
1) Samba copying from PC to Med500 using TeraCopy: avg 4.8 MB/s
2) Samba streaming NAS to Med500x: streaming limit around 25 Mbps = 3.13 MB/s
Above this movies start to stutter or audio falls out.

Note:
During this tests I compared 2 movies of the same title with same HD resolution (1080p) and audio tracks in it, one was BDMV BlueRay format, other was a .mkv.
The BDMV BlueRay movie had an avg. streaming speed of 3500 kB/s = 3.5 MB/s, when passing over the 3.13 MB/s on specific scenes in the movie this gives stutter.
Playing the same movie in .mkv format it needed an average streaming speed of 1200 kB/s = 1.2 MB/s

Conclusions from this tests and with this setup (other setup might give different results):
- max streaming speed with Samba connection is around 25 Mbps = 3.13 MB/s. When this speed is exceeded, movie will start to stutter
- .mkv movies are better optimized for streaming over the network then BlueRay BDMV movies. BlueRay BDMV movies needs 2x-3x the bandwith for streaming then a .mkv movie. So risk to run into some bandwith bottleneck and so getting stutter is 2x-3x higher streaming a BlueRay movie then an .mkv movie

Advise for streaming 1080p HD content:
- .mkv is preferred above BlueRay to prevent any stutter during streaming. Convert to .mkv, remove unused audio tracks
- when you don't want to convert your BlueRay to .mkv when getting stutter: remove unused audio tracks or play just from attached usb disk or internal Mede8er disk.
Read the  Mede8er 400X/500X Beginners Guide
or Mede8er 500X2/400X2/450X2 Beginners Guide

Also check the Couto X3D Newbies Guide first.

Please don't PM me but post on the forum.

Offline wayne99

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Re: [Tip] Working Network Case Studies
« Reply #7 on: December 24, 2010, 01:55:18 am »
Case 7

Architecture

1) Dlink DSL-502B ADSL2+ Modem Router.
This is located in store room. No wireless cpability, only 1 single Ethernet port. DHCP enable on this.

2) Linksys Wireless Access Point - WAP54G (2.4 Ghz). Setup to be only in G mode and connected to the DSL-502B modem. WPA-PSK security

3)TP-link WR1043ND (2.4GHz) (300N - Draft) place at TV cabinet near mede8er. 1 WAN port, 4 LAN port and 802.11bgn mode capable. Setup as mixed bgn mode, turn on WDS and uses same WPA-PSK security details as WAP54G (SSID can be same or different, depends on your preference, try both, still work). Use site survey will be easiest. DHCP need to be turned off (and i haven't figure out is there any benefit of using separate DHCP).

4) Mede8er connected to 1 of the LAN port of WR1043ND.

5) Netbook (Win 7 Ultimate) connected to WR1043ND in 300N mode.

6) 2 company work laptops(Win 7 Profesional)  and 1 smartphone connected to WAP54G or to WR1043ND wireless depend on which one is nearer for net usage.

Tweaks

1) Single high quality ADSL filter placed in master phone socket. All phones connect to the phone
side and the modem/ router is connected by a 10 ft fax cable.
This is needed to ensure that my home security system doesn't interfere with the DATA usage for ASDL

2) Channels selected by using inSSIDer 2.0 software(freeware). Great to know that which channel will be best for your setting as center band. Very useful if you live in high rise building and surrounded by neighbours with WIFI( i have at least 8 different wifi active around my house)

Performance

1) Samba copying from PC to Med500(or vice-versa) averagely 4-4.5 MByte/s

2)  Samba streaming from PC to Med500x  25 Mbit/s (HDV)
 
Using WIFI-N dongle the speed is really intermittent and will drop connection when doing huge file samba activities. Hence  trigger me to setup above set up using wireless bridge
« Last Edit: December 24, 2010, 02:01:02 am by wayne99 »
Mede8er with f/w V4 final HD included version(Jan 25th)
TV: Composite connection to Samsung TV(still no LCD yet...:( )...maybe in 2011
Content : Internal 2TB WD Cavier Green (mede8er formatted) - modded to ext3 partition
Network : Mede8er - LAN connection to TP-link WR1043ND for NAS/streaming
PC : Windows 7 connect wireless 300N to WR1043ND.

Offline Harkonnen

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Re: [Tip] Working Network Case Studies
« Reply #8 on: May 01, 2011, 11:26:25 am »
i have deceided to write a simple case here myself although im not a technical person
this setup simply does EVERYTHING you can want from you Mede8er!

Architecture

1) Netgear WNR3500L router

   Mede8ter connected with wire
   2 laptops wireless
   2 TB WD USB drive connected to the router

2) Mede8er 400MX mini
   Samsung PS50 C550 connected to Mede8er with HDMI
   Toslink cable to Arcam 350 amplfier

3) WD drive partitioned according to this guide and OPTWARE installed
   http://infodepot.wikia.com/wiki/How_to_set_up_NAS_and_Optware_on_Tomato_FOR_TOTAL_NOOBS
        or this
        http://www.dd-wrt.com/wiki/index.php/Optware,_the_Right_Way


   Installed Unfsd in the optware

4) Network choice in the Mede8er -> i do ALL in NFS

only a small "case" compared to the above ones but this shows that with limmited hardware you can accomplish quite a lot

The (in)famous biddscenes  as found here;
 
http://forums.plexapp.com/index.php/topic/3029-1080p-test-mkv-examples-from-birds-scene-earth-movie/

ALL run smoothly

yes
ALL of them run smoothly

as you can see a LOT of routers can be modded with either DD-WRT or one of its flavores (Tomato)

so
 mod-able router and a HD is enough to build a superperforming mediatank


Offline jer1956

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Re: [Tip] Working Network Case Studies
« Reply #9 on: June 03, 2011, 09:51:38 am »
Case 9

Adding wireless-N with Gigabit switch to current Wireless-G network

Architecture

The X2 has a gigabit inteface as it's network throughput exceeds what any 100 mbps interfaced router would allocate. But it still dosn't exceed wireless-N so the expense of a full gigabit network isn't needed (unless you have other reasons to justify it). So those who currently  only have a wireless-G system may find this a simpler way to add Wireless-N to achieve better wireless streaming with the X2.  A  Wireless-N lan bridge equipped with a gigabit switch will remove the 100 mbps bottleneck between the X2 and wireless-N.  A Wi-Fi lanbridge elliminates the overhead ascociated with the med itself handling Wi-Fi and as a result maximises the lan throughput.

1) Belkin F5D7633uk4A Wireless (2.4 Ghz) 125 Hi-Speed  ADSL Modem Router. This is located in the lounge Home Theater Rack.  PC, med500x2 and other permenent devices, given fixed IP's manually above 200, beyond the DHCP pool. Wireless only turned on when using laptop.  When I set up my first lan bridge network I changed the lan bridge IP to match the primary router. This meant that  whenever I pressed reset on the lan bridge router to recover from a bad experimental setup, it returned to it's IP, and I lost communication. I had to disconnect it, connect via cable and set it up again.  This time I set up the primary router to match the lan bridge. Pressing reset wouldn't lose communication with the primary router. I could then setup the G300NH again via the wireless-G connection with the primary router.  So since the Lan Bridge router was using 192.168.11.1, I changed the Primary router from 192.168.2.1 to 192.168.11.2, and the DHCP pool was raised to start at 3.

2)Buffalo WZR-HP-G300NH Nfiniti Wireless-N High Power Gigabit Broadband Router and Access Point (300Mbps). Also located in lounge Home Theater Rack. This has licenced DD-WRT firmware installed by Buffalo,  and is connected via cable to the Belkin router, adding a Wireless-N connection to the network. The router is set up for Wireless-N only, in 40mhz mode.
Other makes of wireless-router can be turned into an Access Point/Lan Bridge using the opensource version of DD-WRT
The DD-WRT firmware can be found here:-
http://www.dd-wrt.com/site/index
The G300NH was set up using these instructions:-
http://www.dd-wrt.com/wiki/index.php/Wireless_Access_Point
Once working,  DHCP forwarding to the primary router was enabled.

3) Buffalo WLI-UC-G300HP Wireless (2.4 Ghz) N-300 High Power USB 2.0 Adapter. This is connected to the PC in the spare bedroom and 40mhz mode is enabled. The PC is a home constructed Q8400 Core 2 Quad PC using gigabyte X38 chipset motherboard running Windows 7 Home Premium (64) with 8 GB memory.

4) Med500X2. Connected by cable to the gigabit switch in the Buffalo Lan Bridge.

5)Sony S370 Bluray player. Linked by cable to Belkin router. Gives access to Internet TV sources such as BBC Iplayer.
 
Tweaks

1) Single high quality ADSL filter placed in master phone socket. All phones connect to the phone side and the modem/ router is connected by a 25 ft fax cable.
Simplifying ADSL this way improved my ADSL connection by 20-30%.
 
2) TCP tweaked as described here:-
http://www.mede8erforum.com/index.php/topic,3504.0.html

3) Channels selected by using the following guidence:-
http://www.dd-wrt.com/wiki/index.php/Wireless-N_Configuration
Since I was using the DD-WRT router for wireless I decided to use it's comprehensive metrics to measure how good a given channel was. The wireless metrics show that actual Rx and Tx connection speeds for each wireless connection to the router, without having to measure actual throughput using a file transfer. It also allowed fine tuning of the Wireless-N USB stick aerial position.  With this network the alignment of the G300NH also turned out to be crucial.   There is no point going through this to end up with a reliable Transmission Speed of only 108 mbps! Transmission speed is not the same as Connection Speed. Connection Speed is the Protocol Speed. Many USB dongles report that speed and make out your working at 300 mbps. That is far from true. The transmission speed is the actual speed the link reduces too for a reliable connection within the set of speeds supported by 300-N.
So setting up the router in a standard position, that is either flat, or upright, cables coming out of the back and the aerials up was tried, and failed. It didn't matter what channel pairing  was used, the connections never got reliably above 108 mbps, and many where well below. In the end the optimal position was flat, aerials down, and the router turned through 90 degrees so that the cables came in the left!  
In this way the optimal channel selection was found to be 4 / Upper.   The default transmission speed was 216 mbps, occasionally dropping to 162 mbps.  Surprisingly the wireless strength was often down at 30% according to the PC!  Having such metrics in the router would help setting up networks using the Med500 USB dongle as the PC isn't able to monitor the wireless connection in that situation.
Tests where performed to confirm that streaming HDV was acceptable during which  the Link Speed was monitored using Windows Task Manager. Different lan drivers may use different metrics to report Link Speed.
The Buffalo Link Speed was dynamic under load and seemed to reflect the bandwidth allocated by TCP for each transaction.  Based on 500X experience only high link speeds (81 mbps and above), in conjunction with low Utilization ( below 40%) produced stutter free streaming. Low link speeds and high utilization, even if they indicated the same bandwidth (utilization x Link speed) being used, stuttered.  With this Network the speeds don't get below 162 mbps.

Performance

MedX2 Firmware 1.0.0

1) Samba copying from PC to Med500X2 6.0-8.0 mb/s

2)  Samba streaming from PC to Med500X2
       HDV TS - 25 mbps
       Bluray VC-1 M2TS -  40 mbps  
       Bluray ISO  - 40 mbps   

Transport Streams (TS) are the native format of the chip. These are the formats used on bluray. Other package formats have been added by OEM's but they require unwrapping by the support processor. The support processor also  handles streaming. Using packages which require unwrapping reduces the maximum bitrate that  can be streamed. The X2 has a support processor with twice the power. It can handle streaming and unpacking of even Bluray.ISO.

 
« Last Edit: July 16, 2011, 07:22:52 pm by jer1956 »

Offline StNick

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Re: [Tip] Working Network Case Studies
« Reply #10 on: July 16, 2011, 07:23:14 am »
Case 10

MED500X2 + Mede8er Wireless-N Dongle

I have recently upgraded from the 500X to the X2.  The biggest issue I had with the X before was that I simply could not get a reliable wireless signal, and it was a constant struggle with connection dropping etc.  I'd leave something copying across overnight, and inevitably, when I woke up the next morning, it would have bombed.  Worse, it seemed very unpredictable; at times working for hours, leading me to believe I had fixed it, only to have my hopes dashed shortly after.

I'm very pleased to say that the Wireless performance of the X2 using the exact same dongle is vastly improved, and I believe I've now got a stable connection I can rely on.  The actual throughput achieved is still low, but for me, a stable and reliable connection is far more important.  I'll detail my setup below in the hopes that it helps others.

Architecture

1) D-link DAP-1360 Wireless N Range Extender (Firmware 1.10).

2) Primary PC (i7, Windows 7 64bit) connected via 1gbps Ethernet to D-link DGS-1005D.  Signal travels through two walls, about 10m to the lounge where the Mede8er sits.  Dongle is plugged directly into the back of the device.

3.) WPA Wireless security with AES PSK.  Interesting point to note here is that in the past, I used WPA2 and TKIP PSA.  With those settings, although vastly more reliable than on the 500X, I still had a dropped connection on my X2.  Knock-on-wood, with WPA/AES, I am yet to have a dropped connection, so I recommend you definitely try this if you are experiencing any issues. I wish I still had my 500X to see if this change would have been the difference on that device too.
 
Tweaks

TCP tweaked as described here:-
http://www.mede8erforum.com/index.php/topic,3504.0.html
Many thanks to jer1956 for this one!  This simple tweak boosted my throughput to my Mede8er by up to 1MB/s)

Performance
Mede8er Firmware 1.0.1

Samba copying from PC to Med500 3.3-3.8MB/s. I use TeraCopy (http://www.codesector.com/teracopy.php) to push files across to the Mede8er which I can highly recommend.
« Last Edit: July 16, 2011, 07:24:39 am by StNick »

Offline Ripperoo

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Re: [Tip] Working Network Case Studies
« Reply #11 on: November 18, 2011, 11:37:52 pm »
Case 11

I decided to use powerline adapters to the rooms furthest away from the routher and my complicated setup consists of:

1 x Netgear ReadyNAS Ultra 4 Plus (8TB - 4 x 2TB Samsung FE4G)
1 x Netgear XAV5004 - 4 Port Powerline Adapter/Hub)
4 x Netgear XAV5001 - 1 Port Powerline Adapters
2 x Playon! HD Mini (Mede8er v1 Firmware)
2 x Xbox 360 Slim (250GB)
1 x Mede8er MED400x2 (GUI v2)
1 x Samsung PS50C680 3D TV
1 x Samsung BD-C5900  3D Blu-Ray Player
1 x Billion BiPAC 7800N Wireless Router
1 x Dell XPS8300 PC

There's probably some stuff I forgot too.

It's all cobbled together as follows (connection method for each component in brackets):

Room1
Billion BiPAC 7800N Wireless Router (Ethernet > Netgear XAV5001)
Netgear XAV5001 Powerline Adapter (Ethernet > Billion 7800N)
Playon! HD Mini / Mede8er Firmware (Ethernet > Billion 7800N)
Xbox360 Slim 250GB (Ethernet > Billion BiPAC 7800N)

Room 2
ReadyNas Ultra 4 Plus - 8TB (Ethernet > Netgear XAV5004)
Netgear XAV5004 4-Port Powerline Hub (Ethernet > Multiple Devices)
Samsung BD-C5900 Blu-Ray Player (Ethernet > Netgear XAV5004)
Samsung PS50C680 50" 3D TV  (Ethernet > Netgear XAV5004)
Xbox360 Slim 250GB (Ethernet > Netgear XAV5004)

Room 3
Playon! HD Mini / Mede8er Firmware (Ethernet > Netgear XAV5001)
Netgear XAV5001 Powerline Adapter (Ethernet > Playon! HD Mini)

Room 4
Mede8er MED400x2 (Ethernet > Netgear XAV5001)
Netgear XAV5001 Powerline Adapter (Ethernet > Mede8er MED400x2)
Dell XPS8300 Desktop PC (Ethernet > Billion BiPAC 7800N)

Looking at that lot, you'd think it'd be a nightmare, but it all works very well without any real issues.

However, most of my movie content is only 720p and during testing recently I was playing the same movie to 3 different devices without any issues stuttering, crashing etc.

Mind you, I ripped a blu-ray yesterday with 'MakeMKV' (1080p) and that does get a little choppy. :(

But saying that, I do have that powerline adapter plugged into an extension which is not really recommended and which could be the problem.  Everything else plays fine though.
« Last Edit: November 27, 2011, 01:50:25 pm by jer1956 »

Offline jer1956

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Re: [Tip] Working Network Case Studies
« Reply #12 on: November 27, 2011, 02:01:51 pm »
Case 12

Architecture

1) Belkin F5D8633uk4A Wireless (2.4 GHz) N-300 (Draft 2)  ADSL Modem Router.
This is located next to the PC in the upstairs Home Office (small bedroom). The router is set up for Wireless-N only, in 40mhz mode. Mixed b/g/n mode reduced performance and my WirelessG laptop couldn't connect anyway. DHCP starting IP raised to 8. PC  and Med450X2 set up using Auto DHCP

2)PC. Home constructed E8400 Core 2 Duo PC using gigabyte X38 chipset motherboard running Windows 7 (64) with 8 GB memory.  Connected by Lan cable to 100 mbps switch in  Belkin Modem/Router.

3) Med450X2 with PCI-E Wi-fi, downstairs under the TV.    
 
Tweaks

1) TCP tweaked as described here:-
http://www.mede8erforum.com/index.php/topic,3504.0.html


Performance

Med V2 GUI firmware 2.0.1

1) Samba copying from PC to Med450x2     4-4.4 mb/s

2)  Upnp streaming from PC to Med450x2   38 mbps (Bluray M2TS)
 
This is about the same  as a Lan based system using a 500X/400X...and way better than USB wi-fi.  So that means  BD.Iso is not really an option, just as it isn't with a 500x/400x using cable Lan.
« Last Edit: November 27, 2011, 02:26:36 pm by jer1956 »

Offline jer1956

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Re: [Tip] Working Network Case Studies
« Reply #13 on: March 15, 2012, 09:50:05 am »
Case 13

Adding Devolo DLAN 500 (Powerline) with Gigabit switch to current Wireless-G network

Architecture

The X2 has a gigabit inteface as bluray throughput requires too high a network loading with 100 mbps networks. But it still dosn't come any where near Gbit so the expense of a full gigabit network isn't needed (unless you have other reasons to justify it). So those who currently  only have a wireless-G system may find a simpler way to achieve better than wireless streaming with the X2 is to add DLAN (powerline).   DLAN is hugely inefficient due to the noisy mains environment it works with. You have to budget on losing 2/3rds due to the DLAN system reducing connection speeds to cope.  You also have the problem of X2 cpu cycles lost to network handshaking. Basically loading is an approximate measure of wasted CPU time. If your using 80% of a link speed..you've only got 20% of the cpu cycles left to process what you are transferring. That is not enough to unpack and process HD.  You need to budget on 40% or Less.  So  this means you need a DLAN system whose max spec throughput is  45 x (100 / 40) x 3 = 338.  So 200 mbps DLAN is not going to be good enough.
 
Since we are adding a Gbit interfaced DLAN..you can't plug the X2 in your 10/100 router..and connect the  router to the DLAN..and get the benefit.  For that  reason I selected the Devolo AVTriple+ (starter pack), with it's integral 3 port Gbit switch.  



1) Belkin F5D7633uk4A Wireless (2.4 Ghz) 125 Hi-Speed  ADSL Modem Router. This is located in the lounge Home Theater Rack.  PC, med500x2 and other permenent devices, given fixed IP's manually above 200, beyond the DHCP pool. Wireless only turned on when using laptop.

2) Devolo DLAN 500 AVtriple+ connected to mains socket near to Home Theater.  This has a 4 port mains distribution block connected to the filtered mains passthrough socket on the AVTriple+ .  All devices connected to the Gbit switch in the Avtriple+ use this block. That is the Belkin router, and the X2.   Both the router and the X2 are connected by LAN cable to the Gbit switch in the AVtriple+.  You  may  find that you have to select carefully which  socket is  the Gbit X2, and which is the 10/100 router.  When I first connected up the X2 couldn't use the internet.  Changing sockets solved it.

3) Devolo DLAN 500 AVPlus connected to end of mains extension used by PC.  This is not optimal. It should be plugged into the mains socket itself, but then I would need a long LAN cable as well, which I don't have. As it turned out the connection speed achieved was more than adequate.  The PC's integral Gbit lan is connected to the AVPlus.


4) Med500X2. Connected by cable to the gigabit switch in the Devolo AVTriple+.

5)Sony S370 Bluray player. Linked by cable to Belkin router. Gives access to Internet TV sources such as BBC Iplayer.
 
Tweaks

1) Single high quality ADSL filter placed in master phone socket. All phones connect to the phone side and the modem/ router is connected by a 25 ft fax cable.
Simplifying ADSL this way improved my ADSL connection by 20-30%.
 
2) TCP tweaked as described here:-
http://www.mede8erforum.com/index.php/topic,3504.0.html

3) DLAN 500 connects using Gbit at both ends. This means it can  have similer issues to Gbit cable LAN. Samba stuttered, despite having over 150 mbps. So I have changed to Hanewin NFS on the PC.  I followed the various Tips on this, and enabled Flow Control in the PC LAN interface, and reduced the NFS buffer to  8192.  Subsequent issues, and more Googling lead to me disabling "Large Send Offload (IPV4)", and "Priority and Vlan", in the Pc's Gbit interface setup in Windows 7.


Performance

The Devolo Cockpit applet was installed on the PC.  I used this to set up encryption on the DLAN network. It also has a connection speed monitor.  This showed that during the time Iv'e been testing the connection speed is mainly around 175 mbps, and occasionally up towards 240 mbps, but never less than 140 mbps.  

MedX2 Firmware 2.0.5

1) Samba copying from PC to Med500X2 7.0-8.5 mb/s

2)  Samba streaming from PC to Med500X2
       HDV TS - 25 mbps
       Bluray VC-1 M2TS -  40+ mbps  
       Bluray ISO  - 40+ mbps   

Transport Streams (TS) are the native format of the chip. These are the formats used on bluray. Other package formats have been added by OEM's but they require unwrapping by the support processor. The support processor also  handles streaming. Using packages which require unwrapping reduces the maximum bitrate that  can be streamed. The X2 has a support processor with twice the power. It can handle streaming and unpacking of even Bluray.ISO.

 
« Last Edit: March 26, 2012, 05:35:38 pm by jer1956 »